Eczema (Dermatitis)

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As always, you can contact our office to answer any questions or concerns.

Acne

Acne is a common skin condition affecting our teenage and adult patients. Early treatment of acne is important to prevent the development or worsening of acne scars.

Acne treatment options include prescription-strength medications, including topical retinoids, antibiotics or isotretinoin. Your dermatologist will recommend an acne treatment plan based on several factors, including the severity of acne (mild, moderate or severe), its location, presence of acne scars, and your response to previous acne medications.

Actinic Keratoses

Actinic keratoses (also referred to as "AKs") are dry, scaly patches that form on sun exposed areas of the skin, such as the scalp, face, and forearms. Actinic keratoses are considered precancerous because they have the potential to become a type of skin cancer called squamous cell carcinoma. Your dermatologist will be diligent in diagnosing, treating, and monitoring actinic keratoses. Treatment options include procedures, such as cryotherapy (freezing), and topical medications (5-FU, imiquimod).

Atopic Dermatitis

Atopic dermatitis, also called "eczema" is a common skin disorder that causes dry, itching and inflamed skin. The rash of atopic dermatitis comes and goes in cycles. A variety of triggers, such as allergies or infections may lead to a "flare", or worsening of the rash.

During a flare, treatment options include topical corticosteroids, calcineurin inhibitors (Protopic), antihistamines, and antibiotics. Your dermatologist will recommend a treatment based on the location of the dermatitis, severity of symptoms, the presence of possible skin infection, and your response to past treatments. Atopic dermatitis can often be kept under control with appropriate skin care, including the regular use of moisturizers.

Botulinum Toxin (Botox, Dysport)

Botulinum toxin is a non-invasive treatment for the treatment of fine lines, wrinkles and other signs of aging skin.

Chemical Peels

Chemical peels are acidic solutions used to rejuvenate the surface of your skin. The solution acts causes the outermost layer of skin to be "peeled" away and reveal the underlying, more youthful appearing skin below.

Dermal Fillers

There are a variety of dermal fillers available to plump lips, sculpts cheeks and fills in wrinkles and folds. Available options include Juvederm and Restylane. Your dermatologist will choose a dermal filler that best meets your specific aesthetic needs. Dermal fillers may be used in combination with other aesthetic procedures.

Hair Loss (Balding)

Hair loss is a common complaint among our patients, both men and women. Although is it normal to shed hairs each day, excessive hair loss can lead to a thinning hair line, and areas of baldness. There are several hair loss treatments that may help promote hair growth or hide hair loss.

Laser Resurfacing

Laser resurfacing uses laser light to gently produce a controlled injury of the skin that encourages new skin cell growth. In short, old skin cells are removed to make way for new skin cells. This offers an effective and non-surgical way to treat wrinkles, scars and blemishes. New laser systems are extremely accurate and targeted, providing enhanced results and improved safety.

Latisse

Latisse (bimatoprost ophthalmic solution) is a prescription treatment approved by the FDA for the growth of eyelashes. It is applied to the base of the upper eyelashes once-a-day on an ongoing basis. Eyelashes grow longer, thicker and darker after 4 weeks of use, with full results after 16 weeks.

Psoriasis

Psoriasis is a chronic skin condition that causes inflamed areas of thickened skin. There are several types of psoriasis with plaque psoriasis being the most common.

Although there is no cure for psoriasis, there are several effective psoriasis treatments that that can help bring psoriasis under control. Psoriasis medications include those applied to the skin (topical corticosteroids, vitamin D derivatives, and topical retinoids) and those taken by mouth (cyclosporine and methotrexate). In addition, phototherapy (PUVA) and new biologic medications provide additional treatment options for moderate to severe psoriasis that fails to respond to other treatments.

Your dermatologist will a recommended a treatment based on the type of psoriasis, its location, severity, and your response to previous treatments.

Rosacea

Rosacea is a common skin disorder that causes redness and swelling of the face, usually among those 30 to 50 years old. There are four subtypes of rosacea that describe the changes to the skin. Rosacea subtype 1 describes the flushing and facial redness that may appear. Rosacea subtype 2 (papulaopustular rosacea) describes the bumps and pimples that may develop. People with rosacea have more than one rosacea subtype at the same time.

Early rosacea treatment is important to prevent rosacea symptoms from worsening. Options include topical medications (azelaic acid, metronidazole) and oral medications (low-dose doxycycline). Laser or light therapies may also be used to control the redness or skin thickening. Your dermatologist will recommend a treatment plan based on the subtype of rosacea present and its severity. It may be helpful to use a rosacea diary to track your symptoms and identify your personal triggers. Avoiding these triggers is a key step to keeping rosacea under control.

Skin Cancer

Skin Cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer. Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) are the two major forms of "non-melanoma" skin cancer. Skin cancer treatment options, include medications (imiquimod, 5-FU), excision, and Mohs Surgery. We strongly recommend the regular use of sunscreens and sun avoidance measures to reduce your risk of developing skin cancer.

Regular skin self-exams are also important for monitoring changes to your skin. Contact us if you find a skin lesion that you find concerning.

Unwanted Facial Hair

Unwanted hair is a common concern among our patients. Laser hair removal provides an effective and safe treatment option for many, though repeat treatments are necessary.

Seborrheic Dermatitis

Seborrheic dermatitis is a very common condition that causes waxy, yellowish, scaly patches to form on oily areas of the skin such as the scalp, eyelids, ears and in the folds around the nose.

Eczema is a general term used to describe an inflammation of the skin. In fact, eczema is a series of chronic skin conditions that produce itchy rashes; scaly, dry and leathery areas; skin redness; or inflammation around blisters. It can be located anywhere on the body, but most frequently appears in the creases on the face, arms and legs. Itchiness is the key characteristic and symptom of eczema. When scratched, the lesions may begin to ooze and get crusted. Over time, painful cracks in the scaly, leathery tissue can form.

Eczema affects people of all races, genders and ages. It is thought to be hereditary and is not contagious. The cause of eczema remains unknown, but it usually has physical, environmental or lifestyle triggers. Coming into contact with a trigger, such as wind or an allergy-producing fabric, launches the rash and inflammation. Although it is possible to get eczema only once, the majority of cases are chronic and are characterized by intermittent flare-ups throughout a person's life.

For mild cases, over-the-counter topical creams and antihistamines can relieve the itching. In persistent cases, a dermatologist will likely prescribe stronger medicine, such as steroid creams, oral steroids (corticosteroids), antibiotic pills or antifungal creams to treat any potential infection.

The best form of prevention is to identify and remove the trigger. You should also use mild cleansers and keep your skin well moisturized at all times. Also avoid scratching the rash (which can lead to infection) and situations that make you sweat, such as strenuous exercise.

Leading Types of Eczema

Eczema takes on different forms depending on the nature of the trigger and the location of the rash. While they all share some common symptoms – like itchiness – there are differences. Following are some of the most common types of eczema.

Atopic Dermatitis

The most frequent form of eczema, atopic dermatitis is thought to be caused by abnormal functioning of the body's immune system. It is characterized by itchy, inflamed skin. Atopic dermatitis tends to run in families. About two-thirds of the people who develop this form of eczema do so before the age of one. Atopic dermatitis generally flares up and recedes intermittently throughout the patient's life.

Contact Dermatitis

Contact dermatitis is caused when the skin comes into contact with an allergy-producing agent or an irritant, such as chemicals. Finding the triggering allergen is important to treatment and prevention. Allergens can be things like laundry detergent, cosmetics, jewelry, fabrics, perfume, diapers and poison ivy or poison sumac.

Dyshidrotic Dermatitis

This type of eczema strikes the palms of the hands and soles of the feet. It produces clear, deep blisters that itch and burn. Dyshidrotic dermatitis occurs most frequently during the summer months and in warm climates.

Neurodermatitis

Also known as Lichen Simplex Chronicus, this is a chronic skin inflammation caused by a continuous cycle of scratching and itching in response to a localized itch, like a mosquito bite. It creates scaly patches of skin, most commonly on the head, lower legs, wrists or forearms. Over time, the skin may become thickened and leathery.

Nummular Dermatitis

This form of eczema appears as round patches of irritated skin that may be crusted, scaly and extremely itchy. Nummular dermatitis most frequently appears on the arms, back, buttocks and lower legs, and is usually a chronic condition.

Seborrheic Dermatitis

Seborrheic dermatitis is a common condition that causes yellowish, oily and scaly patches on the scalp, face or other body parts. Dandruff, in adults, and cradle cap, in infants, are both forms of seborrheic dermatitis. Unlike other types of eczema, seborrheic dermatitis does not necessarily itch. It tends to run in families. Known triggers include weather, oily skin, emotional stress and infrequent shampooing.

Stasis Dermatitis

Also known as varicose eczema, this form of eczema is a skin irritation that appears on the lower legs of middle-aged and elderly people. It is related to circulation and vein problems. Symptoms include itching and reddish-brown discoloration of the skin on one or both legs. As the condition progresses, it can lead to blistering, oozing and skin lesions.