Head Lice

Our team of specialists and staff believe that informed patients are better equipped to make decisions regarding their health and well being. For your personal use, we have created an extensive Patient Education Library covering an array of dermatologic topics. Browse through these diagnoses and treatments to learn more about topics of interest to you. Or, for a more comprehensive search of our entire Web site, enter your term(s) in the search bar provided.

As always, you can contact our office to answer any questions or concerns.

Acne

Acne is a common skin condition affecting our teenage and adult patients. Early treatment of acne is important to prevent the development or worsening of acne scars.

Acne treatment options include prescription-strength medications, including topical retinoids, antibiotics or isotretinoin. Your dermatologist will recommend an acne treatment plan based on several factors, including the severity of acne (mild, moderate or severe), its location, presence of acne scars, and your response to previous acne medications.

Actinic Keratoses

Actinic keratoses (also referred to as "AKs") are dry, scaly patches that form on sun exposed areas of the skin, such as the scalp, face, and forearms. Actinic keratoses are considered precancerous because they have the potential to become a type of skin cancer called squamous cell carcinoma. Your dermatologist will be diligent in diagnosing, treating, and monitoring actinic keratoses. Treatment options include procedures, such as cryotherapy (freezing), and topical medications (5-FU, imiquimod).

Atopic Dermatitis

Atopic dermatitis, also called "eczema" is a common skin disorder that causes dry, itching and inflamed skin. The rash of atopic dermatitis comes and goes in cycles. A variety of triggers, such as allergies or infections may lead to a "flare", or worsening of the rash.

During a flare, treatment options include topical corticosteroids, calcineurin inhibitors (Protopic), antihistamines, and antibiotics. Your dermatologist will recommend a treatment based on the location of the dermatitis, severity of symptoms, the presence of possible skin infection, and your response to past treatments. Atopic dermatitis can often be kept under control with appropriate skin care, including the regular use of moisturizers.

Botulinum Toxin (Botox, Dysport)

Botulinum toxin is a non-invasive treatment for the treatment of fine lines, wrinkles and other signs of aging skin.

Chemical Peels

Chemical peels are acidic solutions used to rejuvenate the surface of your skin. The solution acts causes the outermost layer of skin to be "peeled" away and reveal the underlying, more youthful appearing skin below.

Dermal Fillers

There are a variety of dermal fillers available to plump lips, sculpts cheeks and fills in wrinkles and folds. Available options include Juvederm and Restylane. Your dermatologist will choose a dermal filler that best meets your specific aesthetic needs. Dermal fillers may be used in combination with other aesthetic procedures.

Hair Loss (Balding)

Hair loss is a common complaint among our patients, both men and women. Although is it normal to shed hairs each day, excessive hair loss can lead to a thinning hair line, and areas of baldness. There are several hair loss treatments that may help promote hair growth or hide hair loss.

Laser Resurfacing

Laser resurfacing uses laser light to gently produce a controlled injury of the skin that encourages new skin cell growth. In short, old skin cells are removed to make way for new skin cells. This offers an effective and non-surgical way to treat wrinkles, scars and blemishes. New laser systems are extremely accurate and targeted, providing enhanced results and improved safety.

Latisse

Latisse (bimatoprost ophthalmic solution) is a prescription treatment approved by the FDA for the growth of eyelashes. It is applied to the base of the upper eyelashes once-a-day on an ongoing basis. Eyelashes grow longer, thicker and darker after 4 weeks of use, with full results after 16 weeks.

Psoriasis

Psoriasis is a chronic skin condition that causes inflamed areas of thickened skin. There are several types of psoriasis with plaque psoriasis being the most common.

Although there is no cure for psoriasis, there are several effective psoriasis treatments that that can help bring psoriasis under control. Psoriasis medications include those applied to the skin (topical corticosteroids, vitamin D derivatives, and topical retinoids) and those taken by mouth (cyclosporine and methotrexate). In addition, phototherapy (PUVA) and new biologic medications provide additional treatment options for moderate to severe psoriasis that fails to respond to other treatments.

Your dermatologist will a recommended a treatment based on the type of psoriasis, its location, severity, and your response to previous treatments.

Rosacea

Rosacea is a common skin disorder that causes redness and swelling of the face, usually among those 30 to 50 years old. There are four subtypes of rosacea that describe the changes to the skin. Rosacea subtype 1 describes the flushing and facial redness that may appear. Rosacea subtype 2 (papulaopustular rosacea) describes the bumps and pimples that may develop. People with rosacea have more than one rosacea subtype at the same time.

Early rosacea treatment is important to prevent rosacea symptoms from worsening. Options include topical medications (azelaic acid, metronidazole) and oral medications (low-dose doxycycline). Laser or light therapies may also be used to control the redness or skin thickening. Your dermatologist will recommend a treatment plan based on the subtype of rosacea present and its severity. It may be helpful to use a rosacea diary to track your symptoms and identify your personal triggers. Avoiding these triggers is a key step to keeping rosacea under control.

Skin Cancer

Skin Cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer. Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) are the two major forms of "non-melanoma" skin cancer. Skin cancer treatment options, include medications (imiquimod, 5-FU), excision, and Mohs Surgery. We strongly recommend the regular use of sunscreens and sun avoidance measures to reduce your risk of developing skin cancer.

Regular skin self-exams are also important for monitoring changes to your skin. Contact us if you find a skin lesion that you find concerning.

Unwanted Facial Hair

Unwanted hair is a common concern among our patients. Laser hair removal provides an effective and safe treatment option for many, though repeat treatments are necessary.

Seborrheic Dermatitis

Seborrheic dermatitis is a very common condition that causes waxy, yellowish, scaly patches to form on oily areas of the skin such as the scalp, eyelids, ears and in the folds around the nose.

Head lice are small parasitic insects that thrive in human hair by feeding on tiny amounts of blood from the scalp. An estimated six to 12 million infestations occur in the U.S. annually. It is particularly common among pre-school and elementary school children. Head lice do not transmit any diseases, but they are very contagious and can be very itchy. They are characterized by the combination of small red bumps and tiny white specks (also known as eggs or nits) on the bottom of hair closest to the skin (less than a quarter-inch from the scalp).

Head lice are visible to the naked eye. The eggs look like yellow, tan or brown dots on a hair. Live lice can also be seen crawling on the scalp. When eggs hatch, they become nymphs (baby lice). Nymphs grow to adult lice within one or two weeks of hatching. An adult louse is about the size of a sesame seed. Lice feed on blood from the scalp several times a day. They can also survive up to two days off of the scalp.

Head lice are spread through head-to-head contact; by sharing clothing, linens, combs, brushes, hats and other personal products; or by lying on upholstered furniture or beds of an infested person. You can determine if your child has head lice by parting the child's hair and looking for nits or lice, particularly around the ears and nape of the neck. If one member of your family is diagnosed with head lice, you'll need to check on every member of the same household.

Medicated lice treatments include shampoos, cream rinses and lotions that kill the lice. Many of these are over-the-counter, but prescription drugs are available for more severe cases. It is important to use these medications exactly as instructed and for the full course of treatment to eliminate the lice. Do not use a cream rinse, conditioner or combined shampoo and conditioner on your hair before a lice treatment. You also should not shampoo for one or two days following the application of a treatment. After applying the medicated treatment, use a special comb to comb out any nits on the scalp. Repeat the entire treatment seven to ten days after the initial treatment to take care of any newly hatched lice. Please note that you should not treat a person more than three times with any individual lice medication.

To get rid of the lice, you'll also have to:

  • Wash all bed linens and clothing warm by the infested person in very hot water.
  • Dry clean clothing that is not machine washable.
  • Vacuum upholstery in your home and car.
  • Any items, such as stuffed toys, that can't be machine-washed can be placed in an airtight bag and stored away for two weeks. Lice cannot survive this long without feeding.
  • Soak combs, brushes, headbands and other hair accessories in rubbing alcohol or medicated shampoo for at least one hour or throw them away.

If your child still has head lice after two weeks with over-the-counter medicated products, contact your dermatologist for more effective treatment.