Lyme Disease

Our team of specialists and staff believe that informed patients are better equipped to make decisions regarding their health and well being. For your personal use, we have created an extensive Patient Education Library covering an array of dermatologic topics. Browse through these diagnoses and treatments to learn more about topics of interest to you. Or, for a more comprehensive search of our entire Web site, enter your term(s) in the search bar provided.

As always, you can contact our office to answer any questions or concerns.

Acne

Acne is a common skin condition affecting our teenage and adult patients. Early treatment of acne is important to prevent the development or worsening of acne scars.

Acne treatment options include prescription-strength medications, including topical retinoids, antibiotics or isotretinoin. Your dermatologist will recommend an acne treatment plan based on several factors, including the severity of acne (mild, moderate or severe), its location, presence of acne scars, and your response to previous acne medications.

Actinic Keratoses

Actinic keratoses (also referred to as "AKs") are dry, scaly patches that form on sun exposed areas of the skin, such as the scalp, face, and forearms. Actinic keratoses are considered precancerous because they have the potential to become a type of skin cancer called squamous cell carcinoma. Your dermatologist will be diligent in diagnosing, treating, and monitoring actinic keratoses. Treatment options include procedures, such as cryotherapy (freezing), and topical medications (5-FU, imiquimod).

Atopic Dermatitis

Atopic dermatitis, also called "eczema" is a common skin disorder that causes dry, itching and inflamed skin. The rash of atopic dermatitis comes and goes in cycles. A variety of triggers, such as allergies or infections may lead to a "flare", or worsening of the rash.

During a flare, treatment options include topical corticosteroids, calcineurin inhibitors (Protopic), antihistamines, and antibiotics. Your dermatologist will recommend a treatment based on the location of the dermatitis, severity of symptoms, the presence of possible skin infection, and your response to past treatments. Atopic dermatitis can often be kept under control with appropriate skin care, including the regular use of moisturizers.

Botulinum Toxin (Botox, Dysport)

Botulinum toxin is a non-invasive treatment for the treatment of fine lines, wrinkles and other signs of aging skin.

Chemical Peels

Chemical peels are acidic solutions used to rejuvenate the surface of your skin. The solution acts causes the outermost layer of skin to be "peeled" away and reveal the underlying, more youthful appearing skin below.

Dermal Fillers

There are a variety of dermal fillers available to plump lips, sculpts cheeks and fills in wrinkles and folds. Available options include Juvederm and Restylane. Your dermatologist will choose a dermal filler that best meets your specific aesthetic needs. Dermal fillers may be used in combination with other aesthetic procedures.

Hair Loss (Balding)

Hair loss is a common complaint among our patients, both men and women. Although is it normal to shed hairs each day, excessive hair loss can lead to a thinning hair line, and areas of baldness. There are several hair loss treatments that may help promote hair growth or hide hair loss.

Laser Resurfacing

Laser resurfacing uses laser light to gently produce a controlled injury of the skin that encourages new skin cell growth. In short, old skin cells are removed to make way for new skin cells. This offers an effective and non-surgical way to treat wrinkles, scars and blemishes. New laser systems are extremely accurate and targeted, providing enhanced results and improved safety.

Latisse

Latisse (bimatoprost ophthalmic solution) is a prescription treatment approved by the FDA for the growth of eyelashes. It is applied to the base of the upper eyelashes once-a-day on an ongoing basis. Eyelashes grow longer, thicker and darker after 4 weeks of use, with full results after 16 weeks.

Psoriasis

Psoriasis is a chronic skin condition that causes inflamed areas of thickened skin. There are several types of psoriasis with plaque psoriasis being the most common.

Although there is no cure for psoriasis, there are several effective psoriasis treatments that that can help bring psoriasis under control. Psoriasis medications include those applied to the skin (topical corticosteroids, vitamin D derivatives, and topical retinoids) and those taken by mouth (cyclosporine and methotrexate). In addition, phototherapy (PUVA) and new biologic medications provide additional treatment options for moderate to severe psoriasis that fails to respond to other treatments.

Your dermatologist will a recommended a treatment based on the type of psoriasis, its location, severity, and your response to previous treatments.

Rosacea

Rosacea is a common skin disorder that causes redness and swelling of the face, usually among those 30 to 50 years old. There are four subtypes of rosacea that describe the changes to the skin. Rosacea subtype 1 describes the flushing and facial redness that may appear. Rosacea subtype 2 (papulaopustular rosacea) describes the bumps and pimples that may develop. People with rosacea have more than one rosacea subtype at the same time.

Early rosacea treatment is important to prevent rosacea symptoms from worsening. Options include topical medications (azelaic acid, metronidazole) and oral medications (low-dose doxycycline). Laser or light therapies may also be used to control the redness or skin thickening. Your dermatologist will recommend a treatment plan based on the subtype of rosacea present and its severity. It may be helpful to use a rosacea diary to track your symptoms and identify your personal triggers. Avoiding these triggers is a key step to keeping rosacea under control.

Skin Cancer

Skin Cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer. Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) are the two major forms of "non-melanoma" skin cancer. Skin cancer treatment options, include medications (imiquimod, 5-FU), excision, and Mohs Surgery. We strongly recommend the regular use of sunscreens and sun avoidance measures to reduce your risk of developing skin cancer.

Regular skin self-exams are also important for monitoring changes to your skin. Contact us if you find a skin lesion that you find concerning.

Unwanted Facial Hair

Unwanted hair is a common concern among our patients. Laser hair removal provides an effective and safe treatment option for many, though repeat treatments are necessary.

Seborrheic Dermatitis

Seborrheic dermatitis is a very common condition that causes waxy, yellowish, scaly patches to form on oily areas of the skin such as the scalp, eyelids, ears and in the folds around the nose.

Lyme disease is a bacterial illness and inflammatory disease that spreads through tick bites. Deer ticks house the spirochete bacterium (Borellia burgdorferi) in their stomachs. When one of these ticks bites the human skin, it may pass the bacteria into the body. These ticks tend to be attracted to creases in the body, so Lyme disease most often appears in armpits, the nape of the neck or the back of knees. It can cause abnormalities in the skin, heart, joints and nervous system.

Lyme disease was first identified in 1975 in Old Lyme, Connecticut. More than 150,000 cases have been reported to the Centers for Disease Control since 1982. Cases have been reported from every state, although it is more commonly seen in the Northeast, Upper Midwest and Pacific Coast. Lyme disease has also been reported in European and Asian countries.

There are three phases to the disease:

Early Localized Phase. During this initial phase, the skin around the bite develops an expanding ring of redness. The ring may have a bull's eye appearance with a bright red outer ring surrounding clear skin in the center. Most people don't remember being bitten by a tick. More than one in four patients never gets a rash. The skin redness may be accompanied by fatigue, chills, muscle and joint stiffness, swollen lymph nodes and/or headaches.

Early Disseminated Phase. Weeks to months after the rash disappears, the bacteria spread throughout the body, impacting the joints, heart and nervous system. Symptoms include migrating pain in the joints, neck ache, tingling or numbing of the extremities, enlarged lymph glands, sore throat, abnormal pulse, fever, changes in vision or fatigue.

Late Dissemination Phase. Late in the dissemination of the disease, patients may experience an inflammation of the heart, which can lead to heart failure. Nervous system issues develop, such as paralysis of facial muscles (Bell's Palsy) and diseases of the peripheral nerves (peripheral neuropathy). It is also common for arthritis and inflammation of the joints to appear, which cause swelling, stiffness and pain.

Lyme disease is diagnosed through a combination of a visual examination and a blood test for Lyme bacteria antibodies. Most cases of Lyme disease are curable using antibiotics, but the longer the delay, the more difficult it is to treat. Your dermatologist may prescribe medications to help alleviate joint stiffening.

The best form of prevention is to avoid tick bites. Use insect repellent containing DEET. Wear long sleeves and pants when outdoors. Tuck the sleeves into gloves and pants into socks to keep your skin covered. After a hike, check the skin and look for any tick bites, especially on children. If you do find a tick, don't panic. Use tweezers to disengage the tick from the skin. Grab the tick by the head or mouthparts as close as possible to where the bite has entered the skin. Pull firmly and steadily away from the skin until the tick disengages. Clean the bite wound with disinfectant and monitor the bite mark for other symptoms. You can place the tick in a jar or plastic bag and take it to your dermatologist for examination.